Animal groups work together to rescue 80 dogs from ‘overwhelmed’ Georgia pet owner

Humane Society of Atlanta

Humane Society of Atlanta

Humane Society of Atlanta/Facebook

Animal rescue groups in Georgia helped give at least 80 dogs near Atlanta a second chance after a woman who often saves strays became overwhelmed and couldn’t care for all of her pets.

According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), Hancock’s Animal Friends — a Georgia-based nonprofit dedicated to helping homeless dogs — reached out to the ASPCA for help rescuing at least 80 dogs from the same property in central Georgia. Rescuers from animal welfare organizations found dozens of dogs in unsanitary conditions, many with medical problems such as “mange, overgrown nails and parasites, as well as one dog with a broken limb and another with conjunctivitis.”

Hancock Animal Friends officials shared on facebook that the woman who took care of the dogs (many of which had been strays rescued by the woman) was “overwhelmed”. The owner realized that she could not provide proper care for all the rescued pets, especially after several canines had puppies.

Hancock Animal Friends added that the pet’s owner was “trying to do the right thing” and get help but was “disappointed” and turned away by police. Once the overwhelmed dog owner reached out to Hancock Animal Friends for help, the nonprofit called the ASPCA and the Humane Society of Atlanta for assistance.

Humane Society of Atlanta

Humane Society of Atlanta

Humane Society of Atlanta/Facebook

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On Saturday, the three organizations teamed up to rescue all 80 dogs from the property.

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“A lot of hard work and tears yesterday, but it got done,” Hancock Animal Friends officials said in Facebook. “The dogs were rescued and this person can get his life back knowing that there are people who can and will help. This is a great learning experience for Hancock County and law enforcement to get involved before it gets out of hand. Thank you to everyone who was able to make this happen and finally get these dogs to shelters and medical care for those who needed it.”

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The Humane Society of Atlanta has taken in 29 dogs and will provide medical and behavioral care for the pets before they are put up for adoption. The ASPCA transported the rest of the canines to an emergency shelter, where they will also receive medical and behavioral care in preparation for adoption.

Humane Society of Atlanta

Humane Society of Atlanta

Humane Society of Atlanta/Facebook

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“The ASPCA is pleased to be in a position where we have the experience and resources to help pet owners in need and improve the lives of animals in communities across the country. Congratulations to Hancock Animal Friends for recognize the need for additional assistance in providing care for these dogs and thank the Atlanta Humane Society for their support,” Kyle Held, director of research for the ASPCA, said in a statement. “Some of these dogs will require medical treatment and behavioral rehabilitation, and we look forward to providing them with much-needed care and helping them prepare for the next chapter of their lives.”

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The Humane Society of Atlanta is calling on the public to donations to help cover extensive medical care for rescued dogs. All donations will be triple matched by the organization.

“The Humane Society of Atlanta is here to improve animal welfare across our state and to be there for animals when they need us most,” said Tracy Reis, director of the Humane Society of Atlanta’s Animal Protection Unit. , it’s a statement.