Jewish worship center in Louisville destroyed by fire, insurance won’t cover loss

Two days after a fire destroyed the Chabad House in Louisville, Rabbi Avrohom Litvin received more bad news: The insurance company would not cover the loss of the structure. “God is the captain of this world and things are going to be okay,” Litvin said. on Monday, standing next to the charred remains of the Jewish spiritual center. “We just don’t see how right now, but we know it’s going to work.” The cause of the fire is still under investigation, said Capt. Rick Tonini of the St. Matthews Fire Department. But investigators are considering whether a separate fire earlier in the morning in the same building may have continued to burn, hidden in the building’s walls or ceiling after firefighters thought they had extinguished the first fire, he said. The Chabad House, a Jewish worship, learning and outreach center is located in the Big Springs Gardens subdivision on Dutchman’s Lane. The building is connected to a house that was rented to a family, Tonini said. Firefighters responded to a grease fire in the kitchen of the rented house around 4:30 a.m. Saturday morning. After extinguishing the fire, they opened up the walls to look for signs the fire might be burning and continued to monitor the home, Tonini said. That day turned out to be the last day of Passover. Because of that first fire, Litvin moved the day’s services to his nearby home. “During that service, we looked out our window and saw smoke and flames as big as our house,” he said. Because Chabad House was built on leased land, insurance will not cover the loss to the structure, Litvin said. The congregation was scheduled to purchase the property June 8, after which insurance would have covered the structure, he said. saying. “That money is gone and rebuilding is going to be a challenge.” Despite the challenge, Litvin vowed to rebuild “bigger and better than ever.”

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Two days after a fire destroyed the Chabad House in Louisville, Rabbi Avrohom Litvin received more bad news: The insurance company would not cover the loss of the structure.

“God is the captain of this world and things are going to be alright,” Litvin said Monday, standing next to the charred remains of the Jewish spiritual center. “We just don’t see how right now, but we know it’s going to work.”

The cause of the fire is still under investigation, said Capt. Rick Tonini of the St. Matthews Fire Department. But investigators are considering whether a separate fire earlier in the morning in the same building may have continued to burn, hidden in the building’s walls or ceiling after firefighters thought they had extinguished the first fire, he said.

The Chabad House, a Jewish center for worship, learning, and outreach, is located in the Big Springs Gardens subdivision on Dutchman’s Lane. The building is connected to a house that was rented to a family, Tonini said.

Firefighters responded to a grease fire in the kitchen of the rented house around 4:30 a.m. Saturday morning. After extinguishing the fire, they opened up the walls to look for signs that the fire might be burning and continued to monitor the home, Tonini said.

chabad house

That day turned out to be the last day of Passover.

Because of that first fire, Litvin moved the day’s services to his nearby home.

“During that service, we looked out our window and saw smoke and flames as big as our house,” he said.

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Because the Chabad House was built on leased land, insurance will not cover the loss of the structure, Litvin said.

The congregation planned to purchase the property on June 8, after which insurance would have covered the structure, he said.

“This entire building cost us $100,000 to build about ten years ago,” Litvin said. “That money is gone and rebuilding is going to be a challenge.”

Despite the challenge, Litvin vowed to rebuild “bigger and better than ever.”

Donate to the Chabad of Kentucky Fire Recovery Fund.