The new Emily in Paris? The Flatshare dubbed the ‘perfect romantic comedy’ by impressed critics

Now there are less than two weeks until the third season of Emily in Paris hits the screens.

But in the meantime, fans of the hit light drama have been going crazy for a ‘maddeningly addictive’ new TV series.

Based on Beth O’Leary’s 2019 best-selling novel of the same name, The Flatshare follows Tiffany and Leon, a cohabiting couple who have never met in person, despite sharing the same bed.

In an attempt to save money on their London rent, the two strike a deal: journalist Tiffany (played by Jessica Brown Findlay) gets the flat every day from 8:00 p.m. to 8:00 a.m., while hospice worker Leon (played by Anthony Welsh) wears it for the remaining 12 hours.

Jessica Brown Findlay stars as Tiffany in the Paramount+ adaptation of The Flatshare opposite Anthony Welsh, who has been cast as Leon.

Fearing that meeting in person could complicate matters, the duo initially communicate solely through Post-It notes left on the floor.

But what starts out as debates over toilet paper and brand-name milk quickly turns into more meaningful conversations, and despite their unusual circumstances, the couple fall for each other.

Although fans of the book have had mixed responses to the Paramount+ adaptation, reviews have been overwhelmingly positive about the six-episode romantic comedy series. Here FEMAIL takes a look at the critical reception.

THE GUARDIAN

Rebecca Nicholson of The Guardian called The Flatshare 'maddeningly watchable'

Rebecca Nicholson of The Guardian called The Flatshare ‘maddeningly watchable’

Gina Bramhill (left) has been cast as Tiffany's colleague Rachel (right, Jessica Brown Findlay).

Gina Bramhill (left) has been cast as Tiffany’s colleague Rachel (right, Jessica Brown Findlay).

Classification: The new Emily in Paris? The Flatshare dubbed the 'perfect romantic comedy' by impressed critics rating showbiz 3

You may have had issues with obvious plot holes and the ‘zero personality’ of the main character, but Rebecca Nicholson of The Guardian he still described the series as “strangely irresistible”.

Highlighting a problem area, the reviewer wrote: ‘No one cares about consistency. Tiffany is so poor that she shares a bed with a stranger and she claims to live off sampler boxes of sandwiches, but she buys the kind of organic milk that would cost her at least three pounds.

Furthermore, the reviewer also took issue with the fact that the couple agreed to never meet in person before proceeding to share a living space.

Calling the series a “cost-of-living cheese party,” Rebecca says the show shares themes with Emily in Paris, where the optimistic leading lady struggles to fit in with her French colleagues.

He continued: “Jessica Brown Findlay floats as the suave, aimless Tiffany, while Brassic’s Anthony Welsh ponders as the uptight with hidden depths Leon.”

“It’s Emily in Paris, but it’s set in the UK, so it’s more self-deprecating, and instead of haughty glamour, it has a soft heart and maudlin core.”

Although the reviewer said she should have hated the series, Rebecca admitted she “can’t stop watching it” and was hooked on the storyline in which Leon’s brother was wrongly convicted of armed robbery.

THE INDEPENDENT

Isobel Lewis of The Independent praised the 'well written' scripts

Isobel Lewis of The Independent praised the ‘well written’ scripts

In the new romantic comedy series, Leon (left) and Tiffany (right) trade ownership of the apartment every 12 hours.

In the new romantic comedy series, Leon (left) and Tiffany (right) trade ownership of the apartment every 12 hours.

Classification: The new Emily in Paris? The Flatshare dubbed the 'perfect romantic comedy' by impressed critics rating showbiz 4

Isobel Lewis of The Independent was full of praise for Paramount+’s “charming and well-written” adaptation.

Despite Tiffany having “maddening tendencies”, the reviewer said Jessica Browning Findlay still managed to make the character “endearing”, while her co-star Anthony Welsh brings a “surprising vulnerability” to Leon, making him a standout. sympathetic character, even when he’s being a neglectful boyfriend and son.

She wrote: ‘In the end, though, it was the Post-Its that sold me The Flatshare.

“These little messages on paper are the perfect catalyst for rom-com shenanigans, for lost meanings and manipulation, but they also nod to a pre-internet dating era when things were a little more, dare I to say it, romantic”.

Elsewhere in the series, Leon is confronted by a nosy rental agent who has received a tip about his unusual living arrangement, which violates his contract.

Though the reviewer says the story highlights how “bleak the housing crisis is,” he added, “It might make you smile.”

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The I

Emily Watkins said the show uses 'tried and tested' rom-com tropes

Emily Watkins said the show uses ‘tried and tested’ rom-com tropes

Anthony Walsh depicted in character as Leon, who works at a hospice

Anthony Walsh depicted in character as Leon, who works at a hospice

Classification: The new Emily in Paris? The Flatshare dubbed the 'perfect romantic comedy' by impressed critics rating showbiz 3

the I’m Emily Watkins said The Flatshare is based on “proven tropes” that fans of rom-coms will be all too familiar with; however, he insisted that the six-episode format gives viewers time to “get to know the characters” as well.

Echoing fellow critic Isabel Lewis, Emily wrote: “Slightly pretentious and self-absorbed, Tiffany is ultimately creative and loving, particularly attached to her best friends Maia and Mo.

Meanwhile, Leon is more conscientious, determined to prove his brother’s innocence and devoted to the hospice residents he cares for, especially 13-year-old Holly, who plans to enjoy her life even though it’s not likely to be a long one. . a.’

However, the reviewer says that some of the most “engaging and nuanced” scenes involved Tiffany’s “emotionally abusive” ex-boyfriend, Justin (played by Bart Edwards).

He added: “The Flatshare is a paint-by-numbers romance, but there are enough moments of brilliance to redeem any formulaic lapse.” […]

“The characters do an admirable job of making the undeniably weird method of communication of post-it notes feel romantic rather than just inefficient.”

THE TELEGRAPH

Jack Taylor of The Telegraph described The Flatshare as a 'Fleabag-lite romantic comedy'

Jack Taylor of The Telegraph described The Flatshare as a ‘Fleabag-lite romantic comedy’

Although the program has a

Although the show gets off to a “promising start”, the reviewer says that it “loses focus” as it progresses.

Classification: The new Emily in Paris? The Flatshare dubbed the 'perfect romantic comedy' by impressed critics rating showbiz 3

While others compared The Flatshare to Emily in Paris, Jack Taylor of the Telegraph he described it as a ‘Fleabag-lite romantic comedy’.

In the second episode, the pair meet in person for the first time when they accidentally bump into each other when Leon is getting out of the shower.

Praising the memorable moment, Jack wrote: “Their first face-to-face meeting is a thing of beauty, one of the most finely tuned moments of TV comedy since Fleabag, which, incidentally, hovers over The Flatshare like a wraith.”

“The parallels are stark: a London comedy about a dysfunctional young woman with a tragic love life.”

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But after a “promising start,” the reviewer says the show begins to “lose focus,” specifically when the pair try to reunite an elderly couple while Tiffany’s ex-boyfriend “becomes the stalker’s Batman” and listen to your phone.

“There’s hardly a hot topic left untouched, which means nothing gets the attention it deserves,” Jack wrote. “The Flatshare is always playing for an audience beyond the screen, with an eye on the endless flurry of social media discourse.”

The new Emily in Paris? The Flatshare dubbed the 'perfect romantic comedy' by impressed critics 65338651 11511729 image a 33 1670420341354

The new Emily in Paris? The Flatshare dubbed the 'perfect romantic comedy' by impressed critics 65333199 11511729 image a 22 1670418658735

The new Emily in Paris? The Flatshare dubbed the 'perfect romantic comedy' by impressed critics 65333197 11511729 image a 23 1670418662143

Viewers were divided over the television adaptation on Twitter.

Viewers were divided over the television adaptation on Twitter.

Unsurprisingly, the reaction from viewers on Twitter has also been mixed.

‘This is joyful,’ wrote one. “I loved the book and the adaptation is fabulous.”

Another added: ‘The TV adaptation of The Flatshare is very good. Great script, great cast, true to the book but also has its own vibe. It has the same energy as Everything I Know About Love. I would wholeheartedly recommend it.’

However, others took issue with the changes made to the plot of the television adaptation.

A third said: ‘I just finished watching Beth O’leary’s adaptation of The Flatshare series and I’m sorry I couldn’t enjoy it.

‘Don’t get me wrong, it was a good show (if you didn’t read the book) but it literally changed a lot of things. I understand they usually do, but not to this extent.

“The Flatshare TV show has turned Tiffy from a good but flawed character in the book into the most annoying woman ever,” said a fourth viewer. ‘Upset.’

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