West Des Moines Fireworks Show Next to Animal Shelter Scares Pets

The official West Des Moines fireworks display used to be in Raccoon River Park. But in recent years, the city has lit them up on Mills Civic Parkway, causing some stress for the pets across the street at the Furry Friends Refuge. scare shelter pets. Volunteers and staff are there to help, trying to tire and feed the dogs before the show starts. Once the sky begins to turn red, white, and blue, they turn on the music to drown out the loud bangs. “For animals that are especially sensitive to noise, we have some medications to try to help them,” Gagne said. “But it’s something we have to work with them on.” They’ve been working to get animals adopted or into foster homes before tonight’s big show, but say they’re still almost fully booked. “It’s a very, very busy season for shelters, particularly this year, shelters across the country have had a tremendous number of dogs that need them,” she said. She expects it to get even busier. “A lot of animals that are allowed out during fireworks shows get scared and tend to run away,” Gagne said. “We’re hoping we’ll also see a good number of stray dogs coming from those communities into our building today. So we’re working around the clock to notify owners and try to round them up over the holidays.” All owners are encouraged to keep pets inside during fireworks and provide them with a safe and quiet place to hide during the noise. You can find more information about which pets are available for adoption here.

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The official West Des Moines fireworks display used to be in Raccoon River Park. But in recent years, the city has lit them up on Mills Civic Parkway, causing some stress for the pets across the street at the Furry Friends Refuge.

The 4th of July celebrations are an exciting time for most, but shelter director Britt Gagne says loud bangs can easily spook shelter pets.

Volunteers and staff are there to help, trying to tire and feed the dogs before the show starts. Once the sky starts turning red, white, and blue, they play loud music to drown out the loud bangs.

“For animals that are especially sensitive to noise, we have some medications to try to help them,” Gagne said. “But it’s something we have to work out with them.”

They’ve been working to get animals up for adoption or into foster homes before tonight’s big show, but say they’re still almost fully booked.

“It’s a very, very busy season for shelters, particularly this year, shelters across the country have had a tremendous number of dogs that need them,” she said.

She expects it to get even busier.

“A lot of animals that are allowed out during fireworks shows get scared and tend to run away,” Gagne said. “We’re hoping we’ll also see a good number of stray dogs coming from those communities into our building today. So we’re working around the clock to notify owners and try to round them up over the holidays.”

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They encourage all owners to keep pets indoors during fireworks and provide them with a safe, quiet place to hide during the noise.

You can find more information about which pets are available for adoption here.