Why the narrative that critical race theory ‘makes white kids feel guilty’ is a lie

know about Why the narrative that critical race theory ‘makes white kids feel guilty’ is a lie

The wave of state legislation and school board policies Restricting what educators can and cannot teach shows no signs of slowing down. These efforts are based on a narrative that learning about the history of racism and white supremacy hurts students, particularly white students, by making them feel guilty and ashamed. We emphatically reject this narrative; in no way matches our combined 30+ years of experience as public school teachers.

It is not the teaching about racism that endangers our students, but the curricular gag rules that seek to perpetuate their miseducation.

Our use of the term “miseducation” comes from Carter G. Woodson’s 1933 text, “The Miseducation of the Negro.” Woodson argued that the fight for education was not just about access, but also about curricula. How could formal education be liberating for a child if “the inferiority of the Negro is instilled in him in almost every class he enters and in almost every book he studies?” Woodson was also clear that racist curricula affect black and white children. To those who claimed that children were too young to face the history of racism in the classroom, Woodson responded: